Categories
Desserts Eat

Halloween Treats :: Candy Witch Fingers

Need a last minute Halloween treat idea? These green apple candy witch fingers are sure to intrigue any guest.

Halloween Treats Candy Witch Fingers

I’m a big fan of the green witch from The Wizard of Oz! When I think of Halloween my mind always goes to her fabulous green face and long boney fingers that seem to wrap endlessly around everything they touch. I had those fingers in mind when I dreamed up these green apple Jolly Rancher® Halloween treats!

The pucker of green apple paired with the glorious green make these the perfect Halloween treat! I just love how translucent they are, almost glowing, as they wait patiently on the plate.

Halloween Treats Candy Witch Fingers

They are so simple to make!! I used this Wilton Fingers Non-Stick Pan to make my witch fingers. Any local craft store should have some kind of finger shaped pan in the seasonal section if you don’t already have one. Just spray the pan with a non-stick spray, unwrap the candy, and place 3 candies in each finger (don’t overfill, they will bubble over).  Pop them in the oven for about 6-8 minutes and that’s it! I gave my witch fingers a candy melt manicure which was also super easy! Just melt some red (or any color you desire) candy melts and paint it on with a clean paint brush.

Halloween Treats Candy Witch Fingers

Serve some gorgeous green witch fingers this Halloween! You’re guests will love them!

Wishing you a sugary sweet Halloween!

Wenderly

Halloween Treats :: Candy Witch Fingers
Recipe Type: treat
Author: Wenderly
Serves: 8
Need a last minute Halloween treat idea? These green apple candy witch fingers are sure to intrigue any guest.
Ingredients
  • [i]For the fingers:[/i]
  • 24 green apple Jolly Ranchers
  • 1 non-stick pan with finger shapes
  • Non-stick spray
  • [i]For the nails:[/i]
  • red candy melts for the finger nails
  • clean paint brush
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 275º
  2. [i]To make the fingers :[/i]
  3. Spray non-stick pan with some cooking spray
  4. Unwrap the 24 Jolly Rancher candies and put 3 in each finger
  5. Cook for 6-8 minutes. Watch the oven and take out when candies are melted, if you leave then in too long they’ll burn and turn a brown color.
  6. Let fingers cool and set. The fingers should pop out when you turn pan over but if they don’t then use the tip of a knife under the edge to help come undone.
  7. [i]For the nails :[/i]
  8. Melt the candy melts in microwave according to package instructions .
  9. Using a clean paint brush, paint the red melted candy on like nail polish, let dry.

 

Categories
Desserts Eat Holidays

Peppermint Patty Recipe

This peppermint patty recipe is perfect for any sweet tooth.

March.

To me the month of March means biting cold blustery days filled with blue skies, fast moving clouds and bursts of bright sunshine poking through.

It’s a month of transition.

Winter is loosing its icy hold as spring ever so slowly begins to unfurl tender green leaves pushing through the semi-frozen earth.   

If I had to pick a flavor combination to express March it would be a cool refreshing minty bite surrounded by smooth, rich chocolate. 

In other words, a peppermint pattie.

3-peppermint-o'patties-no-center-showing

Or actually, a “Peppermint O’Pattie”. They’re fun & easy and even better with a shamrock green center. Let me show you how easy this Peppermint Patty recipe is! 

choc-chips-in-antique-double-boiler

peppermint-o'patties-filling

antique-double-boiler-forks-circle-cutter

peppermint-o'patties-dipping-in-chocolate

 Cool and refreshing, melt in your mouth, chocolatey goodness that just scream Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 

*insert bagpipes playing over a gloomy marsh* 

stack-of-peppermint-o'patties-with-bite

Enjoy a bite with a cup of steamy coffee (with a splash of Bailey’s cream maybe?) And cheers to the cold blustery winds of March bringing plenty of warm golden sun-filled days.

xoxo,

O’Wenderly

Here’s the recipe!

[b]Peppermint Patty Recipe[/b]
 
Author: Wenderly
A cool refreshing minty bite surrounded by melt in your mouth semisweet chocolate.
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons water
  • 1 Tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon peppermint extract
  • 1 pound box confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon shortening
  • 1 bag semisweet chocolate chips
  • 2-3 drops of green food coloring
Instructions
  1. Place water, corn syrup, fresh lemon juice, and peppermint extract in the bowl and mix with an electric mixer. Sift confectioner’s sugar into a separate bowl. With the mixer turned on low, slowly pour half of the sifted confectioner’s sugar into the bowl and mix until incorporated. Then add the shortening and mix on medium speed while adding the remaining confectioner’s sugar. Squeeze in 2-3 drops of green food coloring and mix until the color green desired. If the filling seems too dry and crumbly, add some water, 1/2 teaspoon at a time until it is smooth (not wet).
  2. Scrape sides of bowl and gather the filling with your hands, and form it into a ball. Place the ball on a piece of parchment paper that’s on a metal cookie sheet and then place another piece of parchment paper on top and press down with the bottom of a glass pie plate. Apply even pressure while gently pushing from side to side until the ball makes a circle about 1/4 inch thick.
  3. Put the cookie sheet with the filling covered with parchment paper into the freezer for 15 minutes (or overnight) until firm.
  4. Take cookie sheet out from freezer, remove top sheet of parchment paper and cut out circles with a 1-1/4 metal cutter. Continue gathering the scraps and rolling into a ball, covering with parchment paper and flattening with pie plate until all the filling has been used. Freeze the circles for 10-15 more minutes.
  5. While the circles are setting up in the freezer, melt the semisweet chocolate chips over a double boiler. Once melted, place one circle at a time on a fork and coat with the melted chocolate. Tap the fork gently on the side of the pan until excess chocolate drips off and use a second fork to scrape the circle onto parchment paper to dry. Repeat until all of the circles have been covered in chocolate.
  6. Place the chocolate covered patties into the fridge to set up for (at the very least), an hour but overnight is best. Patties will store in an airtight container for up to a month in the fridge.
 
Notes
These make darling little gifts for any occasion. Place them in decorative boxes or bags embellished with bows and tags tied on with storage directions.

 

 

Categories
Decorate Eat Inspire

4th Of July Marshmallow Pops

Red, white & blue marshmallow pops make for a fun and festive 4th of July treat! These darling three ingredient, no-bake, sweet treats are a crowd pleaser for sure!

The 4th of July is less than a week away, can you believe it? This is my very favorite time of year. We have all adjusted to the more laid back summer state of mind as July approaches. The days are long and hot and full of plenty of friends, imagination and wondrous adventures which just seem to unfold in the summertime months. My eldest daughter came home from one of these adventures with a bag full of goodies that included the biggest marshmallows I had ever seen. Lickity-split, my mind began whirling with ideas of what I could create with these puffs of fluff the size of my palm. I’ve had cake pops on the brain after making cake pop cards not to mention I’ve been lamenting about how to use the pretty red & white paper straws I picked up recently.

insert sound of fireworks exploding*

And hence, the 4th of July Marshmallow Pops where born.

My girls and their friends OOOoooooh’ed and AAAAaaah’ed as I whipped up a batch the other day, so I knew they’d be my go-to fun treat for all of our 4th of July festivities. Thought I’d share what I did so you could too!

You’ll just need some red & blue candy melts.

Some red & white paper straws. (You could try the plastic ones but I thought that the paper ones seemed more sturdy).

And but of course GINORMOUS marshmallows!

These marshmallows make the straw-to-marshmallow ratio more proportionate than the regular marshmallows. And you know how important straw-to-marshmallow ratio is.

First melt the candy melts according to package instructions.

I experimented with a few different techniques of dipping sequences and I found that pushing the straw (about 3/4 deep) into the marshmallow before dipping it into candy coating was the way to go.

So, first push the straw into the marshmallow and then take the straw out. Next, dip the marshmallow into blue melted coating(and 1/3 of the way) and then tap, tap, tap your hand that is holding the marshmallow to get all of the extra candy coating off. (Learned that trick from Bakerella! Thanks Bakerella!)

Then place the marshmallow on wax paper, dipped side up…

BUT before the coating is dry, insert the straws back into their original hole and let them sit until candy coating is totally dry.

This way there will be no candy-coating-cracking going on, not to mention this helps the straw stay secure.

Once the blue coating has dried all the way,

…it’s time to dip them into the red melted candy coating. I found that holding the marshmallow from the marshmallow rather than the straw worked the best. Then stand the marshmallow pops in a sturdy glass until dry.

I never knew that patriotic could look so cute.

Make sure to taste one just to make sure that they are edible for all of your friends and family.

I know, I know. The sacrifices that we have to make.

This is the perfect fun & festive sweet treat. Three ingredients. No mess. No hot oven to contend with in the blazing summer heat.

I’m in.

Happy Red, White & Blue!

~Wenderly

4th of July Marshmallow Pops
Serves: 20
A perfect fun & festive sweet treat on a stick!
Ingredients
  • 1 bag of red candy melts
  • 1 bag of blue candy melts
  • 20 large marshmallows
  • 20 red & white striped paper straws
Instructions
  1. Melt red & blue candy melts in separate bowls according to package instructions.
  2. Insert a straw 3/4 deep into each marshmallow and take out again. This will leave the hole where the straw will go after dipping marshmallows.
  3. Dip the side of the marshmallow with the hole into the melted blue candy coating. Hold marshmallow over bowl after dipping and tap your hand until excess candy coating has been tapped off of the marshmallow.
  4. Place marshmallow with the dipped side up and insert straw into each hole. Let dry completely.
  5. Once the blue coating is completely dry, hold the marshmallow by the sides (not the straw) and dip into the red melted candy coating. Tap hand to shake off excess candy coating.
  6. Place the marshmallow pop (straw side down) into a heavy glass to dry.

Categories
Eat Snacks

Aunt Marcey’s Old Fashioned Hard Tack Candy

Old fashioned hard tack candy is a holiday family favorite. The vibrant flavors and marvelous colors delight any age and makes a perfect hostess gift!

I always know that Christmas is drawing near when my sister Marcey gets into old fashioned hard tack candy mode.

She is an old fashioned hard tack candy making guru.

For as long as I can remember in the weeks leading up to Christmas, she has been like a mad scientist in her kitchen whirling around clanking cookie sheets, gathering dozens of tiny glass viles filed with a plethora of scented oils and flavorings. There are pounds of sugar, bottles of corn syrup and did I mention hammers and screw drivers?

Yes, I said hammers and screw drivers.

This year we decided to make it a family affair. My mom, my girls and I got together for a hard tack candy making extravaganza. I am now armed with pounds of colorful, brilliantly flavored candy that I have divided into sweet little Ball glass jelly jars to give as Christmas treats and hostess gifts. Thought you might like to do the same.

Here’s the skinny on how we like to make it.

You’ll need food coloring and scented vials (or drams) of oils and flavorings.

You can find them in your baking isle (some stores still keep them in the pharmacy like they did in the old fashioned days).

I just love these little vials. Aren’t they sweet?

My sister hoards them like they’re going out of style.

O.k. she shares them but she collects them all year round to insure that she’ll have enough of her favorite flavors.

There are two different types of candy & baking flavorings. There are *oils* and there are *flavorings*. We have found that you’ll need 2 of the flavoring vials and 1 of the oil vials in each batch. (With the exception of lemon…you’ll want to use 2 lemon oil vials to ensure the proper lemon-y tongue tantalizing zing).

Once you’ve got all of your flavorings and colorings in a row you’re ready to make your first batch! Remember  how I mentioned my sister being a mad scientist? While I jest…it isn’t too far from the truth. Making this candy IS a science. Which to be honest makes me break out into a cold sweat. So I’ve kidnapped my sister and all of her years-of-candy-making-trial-and-error-wisdom to help me write this post.

Grab a saucepan, a wooden spoon (not a plastic spoon) and set the stove to medium heat.

You’ll begin by pouring sugar,

light corn syrup,

and water into a pan. Next attach your candy thermometer to the side of the pan and make sure that it isn’t touching the bottom.

Stir constantly until all of the sugar has dissolved. Takes about 15 minutes so make sure you’re fully caffeinated before you begin.

Once sugar is completely dissolved set your spoon down and let the heat take over.

Allow mixture to come to a boil. It should look like this…

A happy rolling boil.

Watch the candy thermometer as the mixture continues to boil,

until it reaches 260°.

Then the excitement begins! Time to add some color and pizzaz.

 

Add one teaspoon of food coloring to the boiling pot.

Again, don’t mix with a spoon.

Let the boiling do the mixing.

Now you’ll want to pay very close attention to the temperature.

The minute you see it reach 300° it’s time to take it off the heat, (some people test the candy mixture consistency in cold water to see if it’s ready but we just go by the candy thermometer).

Now grab the flavoring or oil that you want the candy to taste like. My girls wanted to confuse the taste buds of our recipients so they mixed up the color/flavor combinations. (Yes, our lemon flavor was red).

Allow the mixture to stop boiling before adding the flavoring. Note: My sister has learned that it is imperative at this point in time to carry the pot outside before adding the flavoring to the candy mixture because it will smoke profusely (and smell divine) but be careful not to inhale the vapors. Back in college my sister’s dear friend and candy making cohort went into a full blown asthma attack AND they set off the smoke alarm. Not exactly the way they wanted to spend the day. *Hi Amy!*

Once outside add the flavoring and stir.

Isn’t that purdy?

It’s a good idea to divide and conquer while making this sweet treat. Time is everything and remember it’s a science.

While someone is mixing in the flavoring, if possible, have someone else spray the pans with cooking spray or spray them yourself beforehand so that they are ready to go. You don’t want the candy to harden in the pot.

My sister uses non-stick pots and pans for her candy making and she has found that 9 x12 cake pans work the best.

Note: You may want to use old pots and pans or buy some inexpensive ones because they do take a beating.

So quickly pour the mixture into the cake pans.

Dividing the batch into 2 cake pans insures the right thickness for your candy-eating-enjoyment.

Let the candy sit until it is completely cool on the counter top (not the fridge), to ensure that you will get a hard crack not a sticky crack.

This is where the hammer and screwdriver come in. One of my sister’s expert tips – THIS is the very best candy breaking technique and it’s FUN TOO!

Grab a clean screw driver and hammer. Take the pans of candy back outside, (trust me on this) and place the screw driver in the center of a pan…

Give it a whack!

This is very therapeutic and gratifying. Feel free to wear safety goggles for the full mad-scientist effect. Just a thought.

Continue whacking until you’ve got as many pieces as you see fit.

You will have a few flying pieces but it’s worth it.

You may need to take a little break from time to time and do a little bonding.

Nana and her granddaughters. *sniff*

Check out this gorgeous sheet of molten sugar.

Is that nifty or what?

Don’t these look like little emeralds? Seriously. I may just have to make some jewelry out of them…

but I’ll have to remember not to wear them when it’s raining.

Ignore me.

So the next step is the cerimonial coating of the candy with powdered sugar  Once again my sister has a very specific technique for this.

Grab a gallon plastic bag that zips. Vedy important. Zips and stays zipped. Write the flavor of the candy on the bag. Especially if you’ve mixed up the flavor to color combination.

Sprinkle in a heaping tablespoon, no more than a heaping tablespoon, of powdered sugar.

Then pour the broken pieces of candy into the bag.

Make sure to leave the teenie tiny pieces behind. They get sticky and messy and almost sandlike. Totally takes away from the beauty of the candy and its magical glass-like effect.

I’m sure that Chihuly would agree.

Gently roll the bag around with the bag zipped,

until you’ve got an even coating of powdered sugar on all of the pieces.

Don’t you just want to reach in and grab a handful?

Can you guess what flavor this is?

Cinnamon! HA! And it’s SO YUMMY!

I must admit that this candy making business is really enjoyable once you know what you’re doing. The flavors burst, the colors are gorgeous and it really is some great old fashioned fun.

Hope you give it a try.

Wishing you and yours a Christmas full of sweet memories!

~Wenderly

Aunt Marcey’s Old Fashioned Hard Tack Candy
Author: Wenderly | Wendy Hondroulis
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1 batch
Old fashioned hard tack candy is a holiday family favorite The vibrant flavors and marvelous colors delight any age and will make a perfect holiday or hostess gift!
Ingredients
  • 3 3/4 sugar cups
  • 1 1/2 cups light corn syrup
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon food coloring
  • [i]Don’t forget: [/i]There are *oils* and there are *flavorings*. We have found that you’ll need 2 bottles if you’re using the flavorings and 1 bottle if you’re using the oils in each batch. (One or the other, not both).
Instructions
  1. In a 3 quart non-stick sauce pan, pour in sugar, light corn syrup and water. Continuously stir liquid over medium heat until sugar has completely dissolved. Let mixture come to a boil, without stirring, and when candy thermometer reaches 260° add food coloring. Once again don’t stir let food coloring mix itself into the liquid by the boiling motion.Watch the candy thermometer, once it reaches 300° immediately remove from heat and allow the boiling to come to a stop.
  2. Take pan outside and add your choice of flavorings (or oil) to the mixture. Stir without inhaling the potent vapors. Quickly pour into 2 greased cake pans, divide liquid equally into the pans. Let cool completely to the touch.
  3. Once candy is cooled, take outside and insert a clean phillips head screw driver into the center of the pan and give a good whack. Continue until all of the candy is broken to your liking.
  4. Next, grab a gallon plastic bag that zips closed. Pour a heaping (no more) tablespoon of powdered sugar into the bag. Pour both cake pans of broken candy into bag and zip closed. Make sure to leave the tiny pieces out. Gently turn and flip the bag until the candy is covered with powdered sugar. Candy will stay nice and crunchy when stored in a container that is airtight.
  5. Helpful hint: For clean-up ease, soak your pots and pans in hot soapy water to dissolve the candy because we have found that scrubbing doesn’t work.
  6. ENJOY!
  7. Note :: LorAnn Gourmet Flavoring Recipe

Categories
Desserts Eat Snacks

Old Fashioned Potato Candy

Have you ever heard of candy made from a potato?

For years my mom has talked of this mysterious potato candy that she loved as a little girl. She would spend magical summers at her grandparents house gleefully running through grapevine arbors, relishing in the homemade jams and jellies made from the grapes. Hours would melt away watching and helping her grandmother work her magic in the kitchen. Whenever homemade mashed potatoes were served with dinner my mom knew that delicious potato candy wouldn’t be far behind.

My mom and I have been planning to make this sweet treat for, well, more times than I care to count. Somehow life always seems to get in the way and we never seem to get it done. While at the cabin last weekend, the earth, sun and stars of potato-making-candy aligned and a rich, decadent fudge-like candy was the result.

Oh. My. Heavens. Was it good.

It all began while antiquing.

My beloved antiquing.

Something marvelous always comes from antiquing. We couldn’t believe our eyes when we stumbled upon this little darling…

 

What is that you ask?

It’s an antique potato masher.

Everybody needs one, right? 

After spying this precious find, we looked at each other knowingly and said, “guess we’re making homemade mashed potatoes for dinner tonight!”

I must say that I enjoyed the daylights out of that sweet little potato masher. It made homemade mashed potato making all the merrier.

The next day we set to work to recreate the simple yet delicious candy.

Leftover homemade mashed potatoes, powdered sugar, vanilla, salt and peanut butter is all you need.

Homemade mashed potatoes are key. They are thicker, heartier and act as a better binder than the boxed mashed potatoes.

Put homemade mashed potatoes, vanilla, and salt into a bowl and add one cup of powdered sugar at a time, while kneading with your hands, until mixture becomes a firm fudge-like consistency.

We played around with the ratios and found that 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes mixed with 5 cups powdered sugar made the perfect batch. Evidently depending on the way in which the mashed potatoes are made, can effect how much powdered sugar you may need. So feel free to use a little less or more than my recipe suggests. Just make sure that the mixture is firm enough to hold its shape and not so dry that it crumbles. Does that make sense?

I recommend dividing the mixture in half. I found that it was much easier to work with a smaller amount when rolling and cutting the candy.

Sprinkle powdered sugar on your work surface and rolling pin then roll into a 1/4 inch thickness.

Spread a thin, but not too thin, layer of peanut butter on top, about 1/4 inch. If you use too much it will squish out the sides when rolling it up.

Then carefully roll into a loaf and cover with plastic wrap or wax paper and chill for at least 1-2 hours before cutting into 1/2 inch slices.

That’s it! Let me just tell you that I had no idea how divine this potato candy would actually be. It tasted like peanut butter fudge.

 

I can’t wait to experiment with some other favorite combinations, like chocolate, or Nutella! Mmmmmmmmmmmm. Seriously, the possibilities are endless!

Now go ahead, impress your friends & family with some good old fashioned love today! Wait till you see the look on their face when you tell them that it’s made with mashed potatoes!

xo-

Wenderly

Old Fashioned Potato Candy

(makes 24 slices)

What You’ll Need:

1/2 cup leftover (preferably homemade) mashed potatoes
5 cups powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 Tablespoons Peanut Butter (approximately)

What to Do:

Put mashed potatoes, vanilla, and salt into a bowl and add one cup of powdered sugar at a time, while kneading with your hands until mixture becomes a firm fudge-like consistency. You may need a tad more or less of the powdered sugar depending on how the mashed potatoes where made. Make adjustments depending on the texture of the mix, you’ll want it to be firm & dry enough to keep its shape but not too dry that would cause it to crumble.

Divide the mixture in half, sprinkle work surface & rolling pin with powdered sugar and roll the potato candy into a 1/4 inch thickness. Spread a thin, but not too thin, layer of peanut butter on top, about 1/4 inch. If you use too much it will squish out the sides when rolling it up.

Gently roll into a loaf and cover with plastic wrap or wax paper and chill for at least 1-2 hours hours before cutting into 1/2 inch thick slices (approximately 12 per loaf).

Enjoy!